The Best VR Porn Movies you can get your hands on!

Birthday Surprise

Birthday Surprise

Desired Cumshot – Part I

Desired Cumshot – Part I

Music Festival Babe

Music Festival Babe

My 1st Lesbian Experience

My 1st Lesbian Experience

Just Me

Just Me

The Upskirt Collection: Yhivi Facesitting

The Upskirt Collection: Yhivi Facesitting

The GFE Collection: Champagne Room Blowjob

The GFE Collection: Champagne Room Blowjob

The Upskirt Collection: Yhivi Facesitting

The Upskirt Collection: Yhivi Facesitting

The Upskirt Collection: Heather Heavens  Facesitting In the Stripper’s Dressing Room

The Upskirt Collection: Heather Heavens Facesitting In the Stripper’s Dressing Room

The GFE Experience: XXX Job Interview

The GFE Experience: XXX Job Interview

Be The Boss

Be The Boss

Big Dick

Big Dick

Getting Feet Wet

Getting Feet Wet

Just Lara

Just Lara

Woman’s Feelings

Woman’s Feelings

Be The Plumber

Be The Plumber

The Casting Couch Collection: Indica Cannabliss

The Casting Couch Collection: Indica Cannabliss

Give Me Your BBC

Give Me Your BBC

Anita Applebum

Anita Applebum

Be Her Teacher

Be Her Teacher

Lesbian Jacuzzi

Lesbian Jacuzzi

Lesbian Voyeur

Lesbian Voyeur

Chloe Couture

Chloe Couture

180 Degrees of Double D

180 Degrees of Double D

Inside Blanche’s Bedroom

Inside Blanche’s Bedroom

All That Jizz

All That Jizz

How to Fuck a Rockstar

How to Fuck a Rockstar

2 Girls 1 Cock

2 Girls 1 Cock

Be Her Student

Be Her Student

Hookers

Hookers

Naomi’s Happy Ending

Naomi’s Happy Ending

Hanna and Adrian

Hanna and Adrian

The Upskirt Collection: Do The Curtains Match The Drapes?

The Upskirt Collection: Do The Curtains Match The Drapes?

Desired Cumshot – Part II

Desired Cumshot – Part II

Cumming Full Circle – A 360° Experience

Cumming Full Circle – A 360° Experience

The GFE Collection: Masturbate with Step Mum

The GFE Collection: Masturbate with Step Mum

The Good Boy

The Good Boy

Elsa Jean

Elsa Jean

Maxing Out Kitana Lure

Maxing Out Kitana Lure

Joanna Angel teaches Yhivi to Fuck

Joanna Angel teaches Yhivi to Fuck

Surround Pound with Christen and Julia

Surround Pound with Christen and Julia

Sweet Dance

Sweet Dance

Lucy Doll

Lucy Doll

Peyton Robbie

Peyton Robbie

Love & Sex

Love & Sex

VirtualRealPorn.com

VirtualRealPorn.com

When Dad Leaves

When Dad Leaves

Lara’s New Friend

Lara’s New Friend

Hanna’s Blowjob

Hanna’s Blowjob

JoJo Kiss

JoJo Kiss

Can We Play?

Can We Play?

Lapdance – Panocam 3D

Lapdance – Panocam 3D

Your Daughter’s Friend

Your Daughter’s Friend

Kinsley Eden

Kinsley Eden

Tattoo Blowjob  Part – I

Tattoo Blowjob Part – I

Tattoo Dance

Tattoo Dance

Kylie Page

Kylie Page

The Bad Student

The Bad Student

Lez Strap-On VR

Lez Strap-On VR

Zoe Parker

Zoe Parker

Tattoo Blowjob  Part – II

Tattoo Blowjob Part – II

Sex Show with Joanna Angel

Sex Show with Joanna Angel

Big Booty Sex In Champagne Room

Big Booty Sex In Champagne Room

Joseline Kelly

Joseline Kelly

The Mistress T Collection: Humiliation Therapy

The Mistress T Collection: Humiliation Therapy

The GFE Collection: Australian Lapdance

The GFE Collection: Australian Lapdance

Top Virtual Reality Porn services!

VirtualRealPorn.com

Satisfy all your dirtiest VR Porn desires!
15.95/per month
  • Amarna happily lapping between Onix Babes legsOne of VR porn’s best sites for satisfying all your dirty desires, whether that means fucking one of the naughty students attending your English class, or watching Cherry Kiss give you a presentation with all of her dildos. They’ve been rocking since the DK1 way back when in 2014 and they aren’t going to be slowing down any time soon, with new videos out every couple of days it’s getting hard to keep up with all their content! Get your Lovense and/or Kiiroo out and get ready to fuck, cause VirtualRealPorn (and all their other sites) have teledildonic support!

  • More about VirtualRealPornGet all their movies!

HoloGirlsVR

Premium porn at a premium price!
$19.99/Month
  • Joanna Angel and Yhivi suck a dick together, cover artOne of the finest sites out there to get down and dirty in VR with your favorite pornstars, like the (not so) innocent Yhivi and the Gorgeous Penny Pax!  With a little bit of everything, ranging from sexy lesbians to hardcore anal sex, there’s bound to be something for everybody! 360° binaural sound so you can hear every soft moan and High Definition so you can admire every inch of all of their amazingly hot model’s bodies. HoloGirl will do more than please every one of your dirty fantasies!

  • More about HoloGirlsVRGet all their movies!

BadoinkVR

VR Porn at its finest!
$24.95/Month
  • Black haired sucking cock looking at cameraOne of the big representatives for VR porn, this site will do more than please the senses. You can have everything you could possibly want, even if that means you being Donald Trump fucking his wife and Sarah Palin! Why anyone would want that is beyond me, but hey it’s fucking hilarious! You can get everything Badoink has to offer for the very reasonable price of 25$ (for the first month), plus, they throw in a free pair of VR Goggles! So even if their service is just a bit more than some of the other VR porn sites out there, with Badoink’s particular brand of original and sexy videos, it’s well worth it!More about BaDoinkVRGet all their movies!

Naughty America VR

Huge selection, tons of options!
$ 26.34/Month
  • Audrey with her arms around a guy looking back at the camera with her ass peaking out of her short black skirtIf you want to watch sexy BGG threesomes, sex with your hot (and somewhat dominating) boss, or fucking the two hottest and naughtiest girls on campus in immersive, High Definition VR, Naughty America VR is the place to be! Newly updated to releasing 2 new amazing VR Porn videos every week, so that you won’t ever get bored. With over 50 different categories to choose from Naughty America’s got something for every different taste!
  • More about Naughty America VRGet all their movies!

Which VR headsets are the best for VR Porn?

There’s probably well over a hundred different VR headsets out there today, but most of them either suck hard or are just cheap copies of the already-kind-of-cheap, Google Cardboard. So aside from these off-brand replicas, by far the top five, best, most talked about VR headsets are (not necessarily in this order) the Oculus Rift, the HTC Vive, Samsung’s (in collaboration with Oculus) Gear VR, Google’s Cardboard, and the just-released PlayStation VR! All of which are extremely useful and fun to play, some perhaps a bit more so than others.

The Oculus Rift

The Rift is, if not the best headset on the planet today, one of the best, most attractive HMD’s on the market, and certainly the most talked about (though not always in the best of ways). Conceived in 2011 by 18-year-old Palmer Freeman Luckey, at Long Beach California in his parents’ garage, it is also the elder of the group on this list, at least insofar as its development and evolution are concerned. Throughout the initial development process, Palmer continually shared his plans and ideas with fellow 3D tech enthusiasts on the authoritative stereoscopic 3D Certification and Advocacy forum MTBS3D.com. (Interesting Fact: Fellow forum member CyberReality, was eventually hired on by Oculus VR as their head of support) Finally catching the attention of Techno-Wizard of Id Software, and creator of the classic shooter game DOOM, John Carmack himself (who, coincidentally also happened to be researching Head Mounted Displays at the time he had gotten wind of Palmer’s recent progress)! It wasn’t long before Carmack reached out and contacted Palmer (who at the time was still quite young, and excited about all the attention his small project was getting) about this ‘Rift’ device he had heard so much about, and the rest is history in the making!

Palmer agreed to send John a prototype, and after trying it and seeing its incredible potential he committed to helping Palmer (at the time the company we know now as ‘) further develop the Rift. The Prototypes were shown at multiple festivals to help boost attention, with John even showing it at E3 in June 2012, running one of Id Software signature games we all know and love, DOOM 3! Seeing such a notable title running in such a novel new way had a big part to play in the development of the Rift, and VR in general; simultaneously helping to get the word out about VR, and creating what we now know as the wonderful and magnificent beast, the ‘Oculus Hype Train.’

The month after the Rift’s big E3 announcement, Palmer and friends officially founded the Company Oculus VR. Another two months passed, and Oculus had launched their first Kickstarter campaign, offering t-shirts, posters and development kits for the eventually planned consumer Rifts, in exchange for people’s pledges.
Proving to be a huge success by surpassing their initial fundraising goal of $250,000 in the first 24 hours and finishing with a total of $2.5 million USD, it was all but certain that VR had been reborn again, in the form of the Oculus Rift.

The next big step forward for Oculus was expanding to taking pre-orders, and the release and delivery of the first DevKits on March 2013. Not meant for the general public, it was intended only for the lucky developers who got early access so that they could start developing games but was technically available to anybody who was willing to cough up the cash.
Those who had funded $300 or more in the Kickstarter got their Rifts first, while those who pre-ordered for the same price had to wait some weeks more; and although the general mood surrounding the release was a good one, there were some mixed emotions to be found.

VR was here, but it was strange. It had never been this good before, and it *was* good, but it wasn’t great (and many seemed to forget that these were not consumer products yet, and were called DevKits for a reason). There was a lot of SDE, latency was high, and it didn’t run nearly as smooth as it does today, and it was *nauseating*; thankfully, it didn’t take long for things to develop further.

In June 2013 Oculus introduced another Rift prototype (named ‘the HD prototype’) at the Electronic Entertainment Expo. Featuring reduced SDE, and with a higher quality build overall, it caught the eye of the anxious consumer, immediately becoming a highlight in tech forums and news outlets the world over. Unfortunately (at the time), however, it wasn’t available to the public, or even developers! A year later at the 2014 Electronics Expo, Oculus revealed yet *another* prototype, called the Crystal Cove. It had better resolution than both the DK1 and the HD prototype and further reduced the SDE. It was also the first Oculus VR headset to have positional tracking alongside directional tracking so that you could not only look around like in previous models, but you could now lean around corners and even move around a foot or two without breaking immersion.
Just like the HD prototype the Crystal Cove wasn’t available for purchase, and only a few lucky people got to try it. It was a difficult time for those of us chomping at the bit to get our hands on the new stuff, but it wasn’t long after that we got our taste, and oh it was good.
Enter, the DK2.

Six months later the much anticipated second iteration of the Oculus development kit began shipping, with even more improvements over its DK1 predecessor. This new DevKit featured 960×1080 resolution per eye, was more comfortable with reduced weight, had a low-persistence OLED display which helped to make it way less nauseating than the last Developer’s kit, and just like the Crystal Cove prototype it had positional tracking (it even featured a detachable cable). Although it was much better than the DK1, the DK2 still had quite a bit of noticeable SDE (this is a problem that even current consumer versions still face, and will likely persist for some time), and the resolution was still top among users biggest complaints.
It was good, but it wasn’t great,  and that meant that it still wasn’t ready for public consumption and would remain a tool aimed at developers.
Regardless of this fact, within seven months Oculus VR had sold somewhere in the tune of 100,000 copies, which was an apparent herald to the companies future success.
Each DK2 was a mere $350 USD which, to anybody with half an understanding of the evolution of VR tech (previous comparable HMD’s were upwards of the range of $10,000 or more) was an excellent price! Along with its arrival and success many more new experiences, games, and demos started coming out, among them was our much-beloved VR porn!

On March 25, 2014, Oculus made a huge and very unexpected announcement. Mark Zuckerberg, owner of Facebook had bought Oculus for $2 billion! With good reason, such a disclosure both surprised and concerned many people since Palmer had said time and time again that Oculus VR would always remain its own company and wouldn’t stray far from its somewhat grassroots humble beginnings. Many budding VR Devs were especially worried since Oculus had told them that anybody could develop for the Rift, and the inclusion of a big company like Facebook into the mix might put a change to that. Thankfully, for everybody involved it all worked out for the better; anybody and everybody can still build games for the Rift, Games aren’t limited to releasing through the official Oculus store, and Devs are free to release software independently through their own means. Perhaps more importantly, Oculus wound up with far more resources to help facilitate development and improve their platform, and that has helped move VR forwards in a big way.

Oculus only showed one other prototype before the CV1 released. Titled Cresent Bay and revealed in September of 2015, approximately six months before the CV1 was released. Only a small handful of people got to try it, as with other prototypes nobody could buy it. According to Oculus it carried with it even more all-around improvements than previous headsets and was a much closer representation of the finished product than the hardware they had demoed previously. Perhaps the most notable feature of this prototype was that it had headphones like the CV1, and it was also the first iteration of the Rift that could officially do 360°, due to a small sensor on the back.

By this time, both Oculus and its Founder, Palmer Luckey, had both been featured in countless famous magazines and periodicals (perhaps most notably this Time magazine issue, and its somewhat controversial cover), and Facebook was hard at work advertising their new addition. Everybody knew about the Rift, and their fanbase increased by the hundreds-of-thousands. So it came as little surprise when on March 6, 2015, their announcement that consumer Rifts would start shipping during the first quarter of 2016, everybody went nutsThis time, the headset was meant not only for developers but the public as well, so when preorders started on January 6, 2016, Oculus’ website flooded with requests! But what about those Kickstarter backers who initially helped support the Rift? One day prior, in perhaps one of the nicest gestures in the history of technology, Oculus announced that all KS supporters who backed at the $275 level or more, would receive a special, limited edition Rift before everyone else, 100% free! For everybody else pre-orders could be made for the [comparatively] affordable price of $599.99 USD, and would begin shipping on March 25, 2016.

Unfortunately, not everything always goes as planned. On March 25 only a few rifts got sent, and on April 12th, 2016, Oculus announced that an unexpected component shortage would cause the remainder of the pre-orders to see a delay of a few weeks (not months). This alteration in the schedule didn’t sit well with the VR community and many a shitpost from angry and confused Redditors ensued. Thankfully, the delay was shorter than everybody expected, and soon enough (weeks, not months) the Rifts shipped out (and everyone lived happily-ever-after and fapped to gratuitous amounts of VR porn found on this website, [ok so maybe not everybody]).

The CV1

So now that you know the entire history a little bit of Oculus VR’s past, you should be made aware of the different capabilities and features the consumer Rift (hereafter referred to simply as ‘The Rift’ or ‘Rift’) has to offer.

First of all, the Rift is quite lightweight in comparison to most other HMD’s. It weighs approximately 470-or-so-measely-little grams, which is about the same as a loaf of bread, so it doesn’t feel like a brick strapped to your face (it doesn’t quite feel like a loaf of bread strapped to your face either, but hey, you get the picture). It is also quite comfortable and requires little effort to put it on and get into VR. All you have to do is slip it onto your face (initial setup requires you to adjust the straps, but once you’ve done it a few times it becomes second nature and is often completely unnecessary); you don’t even have to click anything!
Unlike previous iterations, the Rift has soft, rubber/plastic straps that run across the top and back of your head, which are noticeably more comfortable than the fabric straps of the DevKits. The headset itself is also pleasant to look at, and quite durable to boot. Made of sleek black plastic and some high-quality fabric-like material, it isn’t hard to see a great deal of care and attention went into its creation.
If I were hard-pressed to pick a favorite headset based on build quality alone, it would be the Rift, hands down!

Durability and aesthetics aren’t everything, though, and good optics and sound are perhaps two of the most important qualities for a good VR headset to have. Thankfully these are both areas where the Rift excels as well. Not only does it have super-comfy built-in headphones that fit nice and snug on your head, but they are also very high quality, and have amazing (we’re talking audiophile levels here) binaural sound (which makes all the difference)!

The resolution has also significantly improved from the prototypes and DevKits. Instead of having 960×1080 per each eye, the Rift now has 1080×1200 resolution per eye, and there’s a lot less ugly jagged lines (it can do better anti-aliasing too) so, it’s much smoother and nicer as far as visuals go. The higher pixel count and reduced pixel gap also help lessen the once very noticeable (and frequently referenced) Screen Door Effect. The SDE in the Rift isn’t too apparent anymore, and far from a big deal like it was thought of previously.

Another notable improvement is in the quality of tracking. Utilizing a similar (but sleeker and just plain better) outside-in ‘Constellation’ camera system, the amount of skipped frames (which can be uncomfortable and nauseating) is now negligible as well. The camera sensor also tracks a pretty good distance. Even with the one camera that comes out-of-the-box (more can be purchased and added individually for even better tracking), you’ll find you should have the freedom to move around a few meters in either direction, without issue (it tracks our tested three-square-meter living room just fine).

For the longest time, people had argued that the Rift couldn’t do Room Scale [tracking] such as that which the Vive provides, but from my personal experience, you can walk around quite a bit before things go screwy, and that is just with one camera (more can be added). In fact, Oculus recently announced that they now officially support Room-Scale, so buying a new sensor and putting them on opposite sides of the room will allow you to track a larger area. Official Room Scale support is a big step for Oculus because it has access to both the Oculus Store and Steam VR. That means that in effect, once Touch (the upcoming Oculus hand-tracking controllers) is released, any game designed for the HTC Vive will be fully playable within the Rift. Using Touch, not only will you be able to interact with things in VR using your hands in the same way the Vive does, but you will also be able to move your fingers around and see them move in VR too. It’s designed to use various proximity sensors that can detect how far your fingers are from the controller, so while it won’t track your digits 1:1 like a Leap-Motion will, it can get a basic idea of where things are, and it translates quite well to the experience.
You can already preorder Touch, but they won’t start shipping until December 2016. For both the Touch controllers and the Rift, expect to shell out a bit of cash at $798 USD, which may seem a little high but is well worth it for what you are getting (and priced comparatively to the HTC Vive). You can buy either the Rift or the Touch by themselves for $599 and $199 respectively. They haven’t yet announced the price for the additional sensor.

The Vive

Another one of the more talked-about VR headsets available today that you have likely heard of is the HTC Vive. Conceived in 2013 as an HMD prototype through a partnership between HTC (a cell phone company) and Valve, it has since become one of the best VR headsets on the market.

Just like the Rift the Vive has a resolution of 960x1080 per eye, and limited (but still more noticeable than the Oculus Rift) Screen Door Effect. It has a built-in microphone, but, somewhat surprisingly doesn’t have headphones built in like the Rift; meaning you’ll either have to use what you got or buy new ones. There’s a 3.5mm audio jack for precisely that purpose built directly into the HMD, so you aren’t tethered down by headphone cable length, so even though it’s a bit of a pain-in-the-ass, the pain is minimal enough not to be a substantial issue (think hemorrhoid as per compared to ass-cancer). The Vive is also pretty light, weighing only a little more than the Rift (477g vs. 555g), so your head will be able to support it without issue, even if you should happen to be a giraffe, or have some other unwieldy kind of neck.

One of the most notable things about the Vive is its fantastic and widely lauded out-of-the-box Room-Scale tracking. Using what Valve refers to as ‘Lighthouse,’ the default setup consists of a pair of relatively small LED and laser-emitting base-stations (it comes with two, but you can add more) which track any compatible devices with sub-millimeter precision. By utilizing multiple small photosensors embedded in each device (controller, headset, etc.) the system can get a read on the relationship between photosensor and laser, and then use some complex mathematical calculations to pinpoint each location with incredible accuracy.

All you have to do to install the Lighthouse stations, is put them in the top corners of your play area, and you have up to 7 square meters of VR gaming goodness; and if you add more Lighthouse trackers, you can increase your available play area considerably. There is one caveat that comes with walking around to play your VR games, however, and that is the fact that the Vive is not cordless (the same goes for the Rift), and tripping over the cord is NOT very fun. You do have some protection against walking into things, like walls, as the Vive has a boundary-awareness system (known as “Chaperone”) that notifies you when you go close to the borders of the room. But seeing as the boundaries must be pre-defined before play, accidentally walking into your dog, cat, koala, or kid, is still a potential problem, so some immersion might have to be given up for spatial awareness. Just like the Rift the Vive has a way for you to use your hands in VR, but the Vive wands, while well-constructed and pragmatic to their purpose, just aren’t quite as fun as the Oculus Touch is, in theory, or practice (at least not in our opinion). As you’re limited to interacting with objects as if they were tools, rather than your hands (Vive wands don’t have any form of finger-tracking), we find that the Vive wands feel much more like using high-tech Wii-motes, rather than the VR input devices of the future we were all hoping to see. That doesn’t mean the Vive-offerings aren’t good, though, they are. Great in fact! Both ergonomically-sound and quite precise, they are some of the best controllers we’ve ever tried. We just feel they fall a little flat when compared to the “OMG these are my hands!” feeling that Oculus Touch provides.

At $799 USD the full Vive package is a little more expensive than the Oculus Rift setup, but they are both so close in price and functionality we feel that either one would be more than sufficient for the kind of product this site focuses on; Chiefly, Virtual Reality Porn.

Google Cardboard

Invented in 2014, Cardboard has remained one of the most favored HMD’s on the market, even if you can’t really call it an HMD. Limited in quality and resolution depending on the type of smartphone you use it with, it’s certainly no Vive or Rift, but it is super cheap and easily accessible. Cardboards sell for around $20 USD on the official store, which brings VR into the price range of even your most price-conscious consumer. Heck, if you can’t even afford $20, you can buy them new or used off Ebay or Amazon for as little as $5, or even get them free from certain services, so as long as you have a smartphone, there really is no excuse for why you can’t enjoy VR (and, or course, VR Porn!). Since they are so cheap and still provide significant immersion (especially for applications like Virtual Porn, everybody who’s interested in VR wants one. To date, Google has sold over 5 million copies, so if you are one of those people who thinks “what idiot would want to strap that to their face?” (in which case, why are you on this site?), the answer is a lot of people. Don’t think that since Google Cardboard can’t play games from the Rift store, or that its compatibility is limited to all but a few Steam VR titles, that it’s short of good reliable VR experiences. In fact, at the time of this writing, there’s well over 100 VR games, videos, and experiences made especially for Cardboard (and any other smartphone operated VR headsets) on the Google Play app store. Not to mention it runs almost every kind of VR Porn you can find; though you may have to keep one hand free to hold the device to your face, while your other hand does the dirty work (double-fisters, forget it), as Cardboard doesn’t have a strap. As you may have guessed, seeing as actual cardboard makes up the bulk of the device, it is by far the lightest of the HMD’s (depending mostly on the weight of your phone.). And perhaps the best part is that it is 100% cord-free so you can play it anywhere you want. A bathroom, a park, at a fancy dinner party; feel free to indulge in both Virtual Reality and Virtual Reality Porn, almost anywhere you could want to (I strongly suggest you don’t try watching VR Porn at a fancy dinner party, nor the park.)!

Now, as you may have guessed, due to Cardboard being so cheap (and being made of cardboard), it doesn’t have all the features that a pricier headset like the Rift and Vive have (this applies to all smartphone-based VR headsets). There is no Positional Tracking (it has head tracking. Otherwise, it wouldn’t be considered VR), and there is still no official way to get your hands in the virtual world. While, in most cases, its resolution won’t look as good as the Rift or Vive, Cardboard fits almost every kind of phone. So if you plunk in something ultra high-res like an iPhone 7, you may get an image that looks better than what a dedicated VR device could provide; and that would be awesome.

So is it worth the $20 bucks? Most definitely! Even with its faults, it’s something that everybody can get their hand’s on. But most importantly, it’s fun to use, and it works perfect for indulging in VR Porn!

Samsung Gear VR

The well known Samsung Gear VR is another affordable smartphone-based VR headset that first released in December 2014.
Much like the Oculus, (whom they partnered with) Gear VR released initially as a developments kit before giving their product to the public. The first HMD they released, called ‘The First Innovator Edition’ was only compatible with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4, but it was still so popular that they sold out on their first day!

A year and a half later in March 2015 the second Innovator Edition began shipping and quickly arrived on anxious VR-goers doorsteps. Coming free with the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge (both have a smaller screen than the Note 4), the experience was somewhat limited in the FOV (field of view) department but gave a much higher resolution than most other VR experiences at the time. The headset was widely recognized for its comfort, and given its untethered nature (no cords) but the lack of positional tracking; it was touted and advertised as being somewhere between an Oculus Rift and a Google Cardboard. It even featured a teeny-tiny fan so that your breath and sweat wouldn’t fog up the screen.

The very first Consumer version of the Gear VR (known simply as ‘Samsung Gear VR’ or ‘Gear VR’), was first available for preorder on November 10th 2015 at Bestbuy, Amazon and Samsung’s official store (of course). Deliveries began ten days later on November 20th, making it one of the fastest VR systems to go from order to delivery to date. Featuring support for the Samsung Galaxy S6, the S6 edge, S6 edge+, the Note 5, the Galaxy S7, and S7 edge (not to be mistaken for the Exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7. They made it a lot lighter, gave it an improved FOV and a much quieter fan.

The newest consumer Gear VR retains the same moniker (which can be a little confusing at times), but there are definite improvements. Having released with the aforementioned Samsung Galaxy Note 7 on August 19, 2016, they didn’t change the model but improved the FOV and added more cushioning for the face. The main selling feature for this version of the Gear VR was intended to be the new Note 7, which was specifically designed with VR in mind. Unfortunately, shortly thereafter the Note 7’s VR use became eclipsed by its random exploding, and it was recalled, then discontinued, only two short months after it’s release. Due to somewhat obvious safety concerns Oculus (who plays a major role in designing the Gear VR) had the Note 7 compatibility disabled completely so that you can no longer use it with the headset.

Gear VR features

Samsung Gear VR is designed so that you can quickly and easily snap your smartphone right into the front of the headset, all you have to do is slide off the plastic cover on the front and put the smartphone into it. The newest headsets are also super light, weighing only 313g without the phone, and somewhere between 420g-580g with. Headphones are sold separately, so you’ll have to buy your own; but if they’re high quality enough Gear VR does do binaural sound. Currently, the resolution is 1280×1440 per each eye which is great for a smartphone-based VR HMD. Also, since Gear VR is a joint effort between Samsung and Oculus, not only can you run VR apps found on Google Play, but it has its own version of the Oculus Home storefront as well! And if that isn’t enough, it supports certain games on Steam VR, so you won’t be running out of VR experiences any time soon!

Like all other HMDs that use smartphones, the Gear VR doesn’t have a way to use your hands in VR (yet), but it can use that camera in the front of the phone for some really neat Augmented Reality experiences. This headset is quite reasonably priced and affordable for most. At $110 dollars it’s a little more than Google Cardboard (we should hope so), but quite a bit less than a Rift or Vive. If that’s still too rich for your blood, they can be found for as little as $50 on sites like Amazon and Ebay.

PlayStation VR

The newest addition to the lovely and trustworthy collection of VR headsets is PlayStation VR.

Its release date was looked forward to by many people, both PlayStation and VR fans alike. So when Sony announced that anybody could buy it on October 13th, 2016 all the fans went insane with excitement, but some were filled with worry: “What if it wasn’t as good as it looks in the previews?”, “What if it has horrible Screen Door Effect?”, “OMFG WHAT IF SONY WON’T ALLOW VR PORN!?!” were a few of the concerns heard. Thankfully, it turned out that most of the worries were unfounded. PlayStation VR is better than good; it’s frankly quite amazing! It has a beautiful sleek design, looks crisp, has barely noticeable SDE, and you can fap away to all the high-quality Virtual Porn you could like! The day that the HMD arrived on people’s doorsteps and they got to try it the panic stopped, and all was well.

Understandably it still isn’t quite as good as the Rift or Vive in the resolution department, though. With only one 5.7 inch 1920 x 1080 screen, PlayStation VR’s single display is split vertically for a resolution of 960 x 1080 per each eye. While that might not be quite as high as the Rift and Vive’s 1080 x 1200  (2160 x 1200 total) per eye pixels, because of some interesting lens magic by the people at Sony the Screen Door Effect in the PSVR is barely noticeable. Coupled with the fact it can do both positional and Room-Scale tracking just as its competitors can (uses one single $60 PlayStation4 Eye camera) it stacks up to the other big VR setups much better than most previously would have thought. Having Room scale tracking is key for some of the HMD’s first person shooter games. In fact, they’ve put so much effort into engaging the player in that genre of games they built a specialized controller called PlayStation Aim; which, although a bit cheesy looking outside of VR, once you strap on your headset, it can become whatever kind of gun you would like!

If shooters aren’t your thing, the conventional PlayStation Move controllers work for VR as well. Sony’s answer to Touch and the Vive wands, Move is similar in size and shape to a Wiimote, and considering how long they’ve been around (the controllers debuted in 2010), it makes us wonder if Sony hasn’t been planning a VR headset for much longer than they’ve been letting on. They aren’t quite as precise as the Rift and Vive offerings, and certainly aren’t as sleek, but for your basic console gaming, they do the job quite well.
Of course, for those of you who aren’t interested in shelling out extra cash for a new gun controller, or don’t care about hand-tracking, you also have your Rift-esque forward-facing sitting experiences (fapping), and for those, just the plain old PS controllers will do just swell.

The HMD itself is pretty sleek in the looks department. Its front and back light up a fabulous shade of blue, so if you’re playing VR at night in the darkness you’re going to look pretty swag. It has a single strap that runs across the top of the user’s head, which balances the weight nicely and makes the headset feel almost non-existent once you get immersed in play (or porn). Not just a pretty face, PSVR has also been designed with practicality in mind. The headphone jack is right at the back so that the cord won’t get tangled up in your face and it features a built-in microphone that can be turned on and off with the flick of a switch.

So how much does Sony want for the PlayStation VR? Well, it depends… For just the HMD itself (not including any PlayStaion Move controllers, or the PlayStation camera) you can expect to shell out somewhere in the tune of $549.96 USD. For the PSVR Bundle, however, which includes the hand controllers, the camera, and an exclusive game (PlayStation VR Worlds) the full setup will run you between $700-$1000 bucks. Oh, and don’t forget that if you don’t already own one, you are going to have to fork out the $399 for the absolutely necessary Playstation 4 system itself.

Which VR Headset is for you?

Now that you know a little about each of the top VR headsets how do you decide which one to buy? It all depends on what you are hoping to get out of it, or course!

Cardboard, at $20, is the most affordable, and by far the most accessible. It is also the easiest to use, but the least durable and immersive of the group. The Rift and Vive, at $599.99 and $799 respectively, are quite a bit more pricey, and also require a bit more tech knowledge to get them set up. Not much, though, since they provide you with very helpful step-by-step setup instructions and there are dedicated forums if you have any problems. And at just over $100, Gear VR seems to fit somewhere in the middle when it comes to both price, and setup.

Now, when it comes down to watching Virtual Reality Porn on all of these Headsets, each one of them can do the job well, but it does require at least a small amount of technical skill. Seeing as you can’t get your VR Porn on Steam VR (Vive), the Oculus Home store (Rift and Gear VR), or the Google App store (Gear VR, and Google Cardboard), you’ll have to install a VR player outside of the official store. Save for the one exception of using Virtual Desktop, which is available on both, but incompatible with certain video containers, as well as lacking many of the advanced video features of a dedicated VR video player. If you don’t know what you’re doing there’s always a slight risk of getting a virus, so make sure you always follow the official site instructions carefully. Never go onto a scammy-looking site and install stuff to set up Virtual Porn. Naughty America VR, Badoink VR, VirtualRealPorn, etc. all have their own instructions to run their VR Porn, and a few even have their own dedicated apps, so be sure to either check out our website, or theirs, for installation instructions and recommended settings. Not only is it unsafe installing apps from strange places, but it can also get a bit tedious and confusing at times (especially with the Rift and Vive since you have to find a folder and enable unofficial apps to run on it). With the big Virtual Porn sites, however, you can get their video players directly from the Google Play store (just search for the studio name and see what they got), which is awesome if you have a Gear VR or Cardboard.

Another key factor for choosing which VR headset to buy, and perhaps the most important, is the quality. The Rift is, at least in our opinion, provides the crispest, smoothest looking image out of all these headsets, and it also runs the most games. It has both Room-Scale support and Hand Tracking and is probably the most popular headset out of the group. The Vive is almost as crisp as the Rift; it runs smooth and supports Room-Scale and Hand Tracking out-of-the-box, so you don’t have to wait or bother with buying/ordering anything else. While maybe not quite as comfortable or easy to use as the Rift, it comes so close the difference is negligible, so it is really just a matter of which brand you like more.
Cardboard isn’t likely to provide you with the best graphics, and it doesn’t do positional tracking, but it is cheap, easy to use, and it gets the job done (especially in the case of viewing VR Porn!). And finally, the Gear VR lays somewhere in between The Rift and Cardboard; sure it doesn’t have positional tracking, but it has decent graphics, it’s relatively easy to setup, and you aren’t tethered down by any cords. Meaning, you can take it with you anywhere you want to go.

If you’re planning to be a dedicated VR Gamer, who will use the HMD for more than VR Porn, and you can afford it, a Rift or Vive might be the way to go. The Rift is an excellent choice if you want a headset that can play tons of games with the best graphics in VR available today, but you have to pay extra money if you want to play games with your hands or room scale. The Vive doesn’t run as many games and is a tiny bit less pretty and comfortable, but everything you need for room scale and hand tracking is right there in the box. Cardboard is good if you aren’t planning on using VR that often (like the occasional fap), and aren’t all that worried about gaming. It won’t put a hole in your pocket, but it might leave you wanting for more.
Samsung Gear VR looks good, runs smooth, and it’s comfortable; if you’re interested in both gaming and Virtual Porn (but mostly the porn), and you don’t feel like spending a half-month worth of rent on and HMD, then this is by far the best fit for you.

So there you have it, five kick-ass headsets all suited to the task at hand. Now, the question is, which is the right VR Porn service for you to put your new device to work?